Blog Archive

The University of Denver has been offering online courses through University College for several years, and the number of online course offerings within our traditional academic programs is expanding, especially during summer term. Over 165 DU instructors, representing almost every academic unit on campus, have successfully completed the OTL’s Teaching Online Workshop, an intensive online workshop designed to prepare faculty members to teach an online course.

During the 2014 summer term, DU offered 80 fully online undergraduate courses to over 950 students. At the end of the summer, 254 students (26%) responded to a survey about their experiences in their online course(s). The majority of students who completed the survey reported they learned a great deal in their online course (78%) and that they would take another online class at DU (85%).

Some of the key benefits of online course cited by the students included:

  • It allowed me to take my learning into my own hands and learn in my own way.
  • It was nice to be able to not only work on my assignments but interact with other students in discussions from the comfort of my own home. I would really like to see more classes like this.
  • If I had to stay late at work, or needed to be out of town for work, I could listen/watch lectures and participate virtually as needed. It was very helpful and took a huge weight off.
  • I can dictate my own schedule and learn at my pace. I didn’t have to wait around while other students asked irrelevant questions.
  • I was able to prepare my own schedule for reading and writing and in that manner was also able to really think through ideas and craft responses to prompts from the professor and other students during online discussions.

The OTL has developed several resources to prepare students and instructors to be successful in the online environment.  For example, we created the short video below of a DU student who gives advice to other students about how to be successful in an online course.

 

Visit the links below for more information and resources about online learning at DU.

The Successful Online Learner

What DU Instructors Need to Know About Teaching Online

Teaching Online Workshop

List of Teaching Online Workshop Participants

 

 

 

Not all students have taken an online course, so it is important we help them understand how online courses work and help them be successful online learners. The Office of Teaching & Learning (OTL) created a resource page for students called “The Successful Online Learner” that includes an “Online Readiness Assessment” to help students understand their level of preparedness for online courses. Instructors are invited to share this resource and assessment with their online students to better prepare them for the online learning environment.

In addition, not many faculty members have taken or taught an online course, so we also created a resource for faculty members entitled “What You Need to Know About Teaching Online”. We encourage you to read this if you are thinking about teaching an online class.

The OTL offers intensive workshops for faculty members teaching in the online or hybrid format. The next Teaching Online Workshop (TOW) begins on July 7, 2014 and is required before faculty members can teach an online course at DU.  Both TOW and the Hybrid 3D workshops span several weeks, are primarily delivered online, and faculty members experience online or hybrid delivery first-hand as students. Participants in these workshops will develop their online or hybrid course as part of the workshop activities.

Teaching Online Workshop Registration and Details

For information about when the next Hybrid 3-D Workshop will be offered, contact Virginia Pitts.

In 2012, Morgridge College of Education doctoral student Angel Chi (now PhD) conducted her dissertation around the questions, “Why do tenured faculty members decide to teach online?” and, “What characterizes their journey?” She interviewed and created case studies of 4 tenured DU professors and shares some highlights from her study below.

The journey to teaching online: A case study of faculty preparation and experiences in online teaching

Excerpts of doctoral dissertation by Angel Chi, PhD

When Bill Gates published his book “The Road Ahead” (1995), he summarized the transformative implications of the personal computing revolution and described a future profoundly changed by the arrival of a global information super highway.  Almost twenty years later, the tsunami of online programs and the MOOCs (massive online open courses) is impacting the structural integrity of postsecondary institutions and changing the competitive landscape of higher learning at an unprecedented pace.  When Allen and Seaman (2013) asked the question of whether faculty acceptance of online education increased in their Sloan Consortium annual report, only 30.2% of chief academic officers believe their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education.  This rate is even lower than the rate recorded in 2004. With an apparent widening gap between institutional strategy and faculty acceptance, each organization needs to conceptually map its road ahead.  However, only an institution as a whole can decide for itself what kind of change is needed and define what constitutes evidence of lasting change.  This implies a unique transformation of institutional philosophy, culture, strategy, and reward systems for faculty members.

Thus, instead of trying to measure, evaluate, or categorize which faculty member fits into which stage of online faculty development under which framework, the intention of my study was to identify participants’ individual experiences on why they teach online, how they learn to teach online, and what factors influences their journeys to teaching online.  Complex adoptive system (CAS) theory (Olson & Eoyang, 2001) suggests that the most powerful organizational transformations occur not at the macro level but rather at the micro level where behaviors and changes began to emerge.  It is in this micro level where their subsequent behaviors changes and shared values may be interpreted through the complex adoptive systems lens categorized in three areas:

  1. Individual differences (competency, expertise, and educational background): the instructors have different levels of technical competency and online experiences but for the most part do not find technology an issue in teaching online.  Their intrinsic motivations propelled them into teaching online.  However, they all expressed needing extrinsic motivations to keep up the much-needed momentum in furthering their online teaching efforts.
  2. Transformational exchanges (meetings, educational events, and faculty development efforts): all participants felt the required Teaching Online Workshop and the experience of being an online student were extremely useful in helping them launch their first online courses.  However, as they become a group of experienced online instructors, they would like to see more informal and formal peer support and recognition.  In addition, they need more relevant pedagogical training and design support in developing additional online courses.
  3. Environmental (e.g. institutional culture and resources): the participants felt that in order to achieve meaningful institutionalization in teaching online, the institution needs to provide clear vision in commitment, reward, recognition, support, and flexibility in every level of administration including the APT structure.  The faculty participants offered invaluable inputs on ways to promote online faculty transformation.

Their narratives painted a landscape of faculty acceptance in institutions and the online learning phenomena in our society.  Ultimately, their stories are really about change. By studying the “change agents” in a changing organization in a changing industry, this study is not an exercise to identify the best practices. Rather, this study hopes to inspire new ideas for new ways to conceptually frame the problem facing the faculty, the institution, and the industry in their road ahead in teaching online.

Angel’s dissertation is available online through the Social Science Research Network.

Teaching Online Faculty Graduates

Since Fall 2009, over 260 faculty members from different departments across the DU campus have completed the Office of Teaching and Learning’s Teaching Online Workshop (TOW) or Teaching Online Short Course.

Congratulations to the following faculty members who have completed the Teaching Online Short Course or the Teaching Online Workshop (TOW)!

Summer 2018

Yohainna Abdala-Mesa, Department of Languages and Literatures

Melissa Akaka, Department of Marketing (DCB)

David Coppini, Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Carissa Fralin, Graduate School of Social Work

Rohini Gupta, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Miho Hamamoto, Department of Languages and Literatures

Luis D. Leon, Department of Religious Studies

Hale Martin, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Gwen Mitchell, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Jennie Mizrahi, Morgridge College of Education

Robyn Pitts, Morgridge College of Education

Ping Qiu, Department of Languages and Literatures

Chris J. Wera, Morgridge College of Education

Spring 2018

Sarah Bania-Dobyns, Korbel School of International Studies

Donald Bergh, Daniels College Of Business

Joe Eisenmann, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Maha Foster, Department of Languages and Literatures

Ashley Hamilton, Department of Theatre

Tayana Hardin, Department of English 

Sari Havis, Department of Languages and Literatures

Anthony Hayter, Daniels College of Business

Laurel Hicks, Department of Psychology

Andrew Matranga, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Chiara Piovani, Department of Economics

Kathy Reed, Graduate School of Social Work

Allegra Reiber, Department of Mathematics

Rafael Rossotto Ioris, Department of History

Jack Sheinbaum, Lamont School of Music

Aaron Ullrey, Department of Religious Studies

Andrew Urbaczewski, Daniels College of Business

Lowell Valencia-Miller, Daniels College of Business

Lisa Victoravich, Daniels College of Business

Craig Wallace, Daniels College of Business

Jing Wang, Department of Languages and Literatures

Winter 2018

Ana Babic Rosario, Department of Marketing

Laurence Botnick, Graduate School of Social Work

Michael Brent, Department of Philosophy

Ellen Defossez, Department of Communication Studies

Jennifer Halstead, Daniels College of Business

Christine Ngo, Department of Economics

Jenn Paz, Graduate School Professional Psychology

Jason Renn, Korbel School of International Studies

Amy Stenson, Graduate School of Social Work

Katherine Tennis, Korbel School of International Studies

Tracy Vozar, Graduate School Professional Psychology

Fall 2017

Marcus Birney, Daniels College of Business

Lauren Delle-Cotgageorge, Graduate School of Social Work

Lisa Ingarfield, Graduate School of Social Work

Kerry-Ann Lewis Pearcy, Graduate School of Social Work

Jason Purvis, Department of Religious Studies

Aubrey Schiavone, Writing Program

Zoe Tobier, Writing Program

Summer 2017

Jeff Appel, Joint PhD DU/Iliff

Yuki Arita, Department of Language and Literatures

Web Brown, Graduate School of Social Work

Sara Chatfield, Department of Political Science

Cindi Fukami, Daniels College of Business

Colleen Gibley-Reed, Graduate School of Social Work

Andrea Grohmann, Graduate School of Social Work

Mike Kasales, Graduate School of Sports Psychology

Alison Schofield, Department of Religious Studies

Karen Stewart, Graduate School of Sports Psychology and Graduate School of Social Work

Spring 2017

Samatha Brown, Department of Psychology

Santhosh Chandrashekar, Department of Communication Studies

Samantha Galvin, Sturm College of Law

Helen Hazen, Department of Geography

Carol Helstosky, Department of History

Issac Joslin, Department of Language and Literatures

Juan Carlos Lopez, Department of Economics

Ahmed Abd Rabou, Korbel School of International Studies

David Riche, Writing Program

Amy Roepke, Sturm College of Law

Henning Schwardt, Department of Economics

Hilary Smith, Department of History

Dheepa Sundaram, Department of Religious Studies

Fall 2016

Heather Arnold-Renicker, Graduate School of Social Work

Ramona Beltran, Graduate School of Social Work

Karen Bensen, Graduate School of Social Work

Stephen Blackwell, MSLA Sturm College of Law

Rachel Derrington, Graduate School of Social Work

Amanda Donahoe, Korbel School of International Studies

Amy McLellan, Graduate Tax Program

Mitchell Ohriner, Lamont School of Music

Debora Ortega, Graduate School of Social Work

Michele Sienkiewicz, Graduate School of Social Work

Daniel Singer, Writing Program

Angela Sowa, Writing Program

Stephanie Stava, Graduate School of Social Work

Stephen von Merz, Graduate School of Social Work

Summer 2016

Jennifer Bellamy, Graduate School of Social Work

Leslie Hasche, Graduate School of Social Work

Shanna Katz Kattari, Graduate School of Social Work

Clayton Kuklick, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Anne Robertson, Graduate School of Social Work

Spring 2016

Doris Candelarie, Morgridge College of Education

Corey Ciocchetti, Daniels College of Business

Sandra Dixon, Department of Religious Studies

Jean East, Graduate School of Social Work

Benjamin Jones, Department of Computer Science

Paul Kosempel, Undergraduate Academic Programs, Pioneer Leadership Program

Nicole Nicotera, Graduate School of Social Work

Richard Ostberg, Morgridge College of Education

Tony Rollins, Morgridge College of Education  and Daniels College of Business

Jonathan Sciarcon, Department of History

Fall 2015 

Sachin Desai, Korbel School of International Studies

Matthew Hill, Writing Program

Keith Kaplan,  Sturm College of Law, Master of Science in Legal Administration Program

Brian McCormick, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Marco Nathan, Department of Philosophy

Melanie Schettler Heto, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Rachel (Stephanie) Speer, Graduate School of Social Work

Jessica Waclawski, Graduate School of Social Work

Summer 2015

Isaac Lodico, Sturm College of Law, Graduate Tax Program

William Mitchell, Department of Computer Science

David Szymanski, Sturm College of Law, MSLA

Erika Trigoso, Department of Geography

Courtney Vidacovich, Daniels College of Business

Richard Wildenhaus, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

John Wilson, Sturm College of Law, Graduate Tax Program

Spring 2015

Nico Baker, Graduate School of Social Work

Renee Botta, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Jeffrey Edgington, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Hilary Escajeda, Sturm College of Law, Graduate Tax Program

Christopher GauthierDickey, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Tayana Hardin, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of English

Darrin Hicks, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Communications Studies

Keeley Hunter, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Communications Studies

Julianne Mitchell, Graduate School of Social Work

Rachael Liberman, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film & Journalism Studies

Melinda Marasch, Graduate School of Social Work

Andrew Mueller, Daniels College of Business, Real Estate and Construction Management

Jocelyn Nguyen, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Arianna Nowakowski , Korbel School of International Studies

Leah Persky, Korbel School of International Studies

Lapo Salucci, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Public Policy Program

Orna Shaughnessy, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Languages & Literatures

Christy-Dale Sims, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Communications Studies

 

Fall 2014

Nancy Cleaves, Sturm College of Law

Jessica Dale, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Lindsey Feitz, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Gender and Women’s Studies

Ken Gardner, Sturm College of Law

Brian Gearity, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Sarah Hammer, Graduate School of Social Work

 

Summer 2014

Phil Behnke, Daniels College of Business

Stephanie Begun, Graduate School of Social Work

Ruth Chao, Morgridge College of Education

Rob Flaherty, Director of Academic Assessment

Lora Hacker, Daniels College of Business, Franklin L. Burns School of Real Estate and Construction Management

Mark Levine, Daniels College of Business, Franklin L. Burns School of Real Estate and Construction Management

Jae McQueen, Graduate School of Social Work

Michael Talamantes, Graduate School of Social Work

 

Spring 2014

Terrence Blackman, Morgridge College of Education

Omar Gudino, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Psychology

Chris Hughen, Daniels College of Business, Reiman School of Finance

Erica Liszewski, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Gregory Robbins, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Religious Studies

 

Winter 2013

Douglas (Jeff) Brothers, Daniels College of Business, School of Accountancy

April Chapman-Ludwig, University Writing Program

Richard Colby, University Writing Program

Jared Del Rosso, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Sociology & Criminology

Elizabeth Drogin, University Writing Program

Heather Kennedy, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Lisa Langenderfer, Graduate School of Social Work

Nick Neels, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

James E. Platt, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Biological Sciences

Diana Rarich, Graduate School of Social Work

Christy Rossi, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Psychology

Rebekah Shultz Colby, University Writing Program

Kristin Taavola Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Lamont School of Music

Julia Watson, Morgridge College of Education, Gifted Education

 

Summer 2013

Nancy Cleaves, Sturm College of Law, Master of Science in Legal Administration (MSLA)

Jessica Hogan, Sturm College of Law

Jillian Holm-Denoma, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Psychology

Thomas Laetz, Josef Korbel School of International Studies

Justine Lopez, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Don McCubbrey, Daniels College of Business, Real Estate and Construction Management

Kris Reyes, The Women’s College

Courtney Welton-Mitchell, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Shayna Whitehouse, Morgridge College of Education

 

Spring 2013

Catherine Durso, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Jacqueline Eschenlohr, Daniels College of Business, School of Accountancy

Jim Fogleman, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Biological Sciences

Tony Gault, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Ellen Honeck, Morgridge College of Education

Lisa Korf, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Mathematics

Sharon Lassar, Daniels College of Business, School of Accountancy

Julie Morris, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Biological Sciences

Matt Rutherford, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Billy Stratton, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of English

Sara Struckman, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Kara Taczak, University Writing Program

Julie Todd, Iliff School of Theology

Nicole Willock, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Religious Studies

 

Winter 2012/2013

Jennifer Campbell, University Writing Program

Hava Gordon, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Gender and Women’s Studies

Nancy Lorenzon, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Biological Sciences

Donald Mayer, Daniels College of Business, Department of Business Ethics and Legal Studies

Michael Myers, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Barbara Scantland, Daniels College of Business, Department of Business Ethics and Legal Studies

Barbara Stuart, Daniels College of Business, Department of Management

Malinda Williams, University Writing Program

 

Fall 2012

Lora Louise Broady, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

David Wenzhong Gao, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Dan Hoffman, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Michail Kontitsis, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Michele Lutz, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Tia Quinlan-Wilder, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Dick Scudder, Daniels College of Business, Office of Graduate Programs and Department of Business Information and Analytics

Stuart Stein, Daniels College of Business, Burns School of Real Estate and Construction Management

Jere Surber, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Philosophy

Scott Toney, Daniels College of Business, Department of Business Information and Analytics

Mark Van Ark, Daniels College of Business, Burns School of Real Estate and Construction Management

Yavuz Yasar, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Economics

Jun Zhang, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

 

Spring 2012

Mohammed AlBow, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Bernadette Calafell, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Communications Studies

Lisa Conant, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Political Science

Alexander de Roode, Daniels College of Business, Department of Real Estate & Construction Management

Christina Foust, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Communications Studies

Jay Garcia, Daniels College of Business, Department of Real Estate & Construction Management

Paula Holt, Daniels College of Business, Department of Business Ethics and Legal Studies

Seth Masket, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Political Science

Vijaya Narapareddy, Daniels College of Business, Department of Management

Tarashea Nesbit, The Women’s College

Catherine Orsborn, Learning Communities and Civic Engagement

Leslie Ranniger, Sturm College of Law, Department of Science in Legal Administration

Jennifer Reich, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Sociology

Stephen Sewalk, Daniels College of Business, Department of Real Estate & Construction Management

Susanne Sherba, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Andrew Smith, Daniels College of Business, Department of Real Estate & Construction Management

Ramakrishna Thurimella, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Cassandra Trousas , Morgridge College of Education, Department of Curriculum & Instruction

Wilfried Wilms, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of German

Elizabeth Winfield, Sturm College of Law, Master of Science in Legal Administration (MSLA)

 

Winter 2012

Denise Anthony, Morgridge College of Education, Department of Library and Information Science

Shimelis Assefa, Morgridge College of Education, Department of Library and Information Science

Bradley Benz, University Writing Program

Nikolaos Galatos, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Mathematics

Richie Neil Hao, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Communication Studies

Xiao Hu, Morgridge College of Education, Department of Library & Information Sciences

Krystyna Matusiak, Morgridge College of Education, Department of Library & Information Sciences

James Meurer, Daniels College of Business, Real Estate and Construction Management

Linda Olson, Pioneer Leadership Living and Learning Community

Siavash Pourkamali Anaraki, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Allegra Reiber, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Mathematics

Laura Robinson, The Women’s College

Mary Stansbury, Morgridge College of Education, Department of Library & Information Sciences

 

Fall 2011

Mark Beese, Sturm College of Law

Nancy Elletson, Sturm College of Law

Norma Hafenstein, Ricks Center and Morgridge College of Education, Ricks Center for Gifted Children

Gabi Kathoefer, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Languages & Literatures

Kellie Keeling, Daniels College of Business, Department of Statistics and Operations Technology

Jeff Kreeger, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Geography

Steven McDonald, Newman Center for Preforming Arts, Department of Theater

Keith Miller, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Amy Phillips, Department of Business Information and Analytics

Nicole Russell, Morgridge College of Education, Department of Curriculum & Instruction

Paul Sutton, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Geography

 

Spring 2011

David Blair, Graduate School of Social Work

Ronald DeLyser, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Kimberly Hartnett-Edwards, Morgridge College of Education

Steven Hick, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Geography

Yan Mayster, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Laura Meyer, Graduate School of Professional Psychology

Paul Michalec, Morgridge College of Education

Carl Raschke, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Religious Studies

Aimee Reichmann-Decker, Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Susan Sadler, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Biological Sciences

Mary Claire Morr Serewicz, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Human Communication Studies

Elizabeth Stapp, Daniels College of Business, Department of Business Ethics and Legal Studies

Robert Stencel, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Physics and Astronomy

Tory Toupin, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Computer Science

Ann Vessels, Sturm College of Law

Nancy Wadsworth, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Political Science

Dennis Wittmer, Daniels College of Business, Department of Management

 

Winter 2011

Kevin Archer, Josef Korbel School of International Studies

Paula Cole, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Economics

David Daniels, University Writing Program

Elizabeth Henry, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Sandy Johnson, Josef Korbel School of International Studies

Megan Kelly, University Writing Program

Peter Laz, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Heather Martin, University Writing Program

Mohammad Matin, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Pallab Paul, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Jing Sun, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Political Science

Margaret Thompson, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Bruce Uhrmacher, Morgridge College of Education

Kate Willink, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Human Communication Studies

 

Fall 2010

Jarl Ahlkvist, Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Paul Bauer, Department of Information Technology and Electronic Commerce

Catherine Burns, The Women’s College

Stephana Colbert, The Women’s College

Christina Coughlan, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department Biological Sciences

Michael Felderman, Daniels College of Business, Real Estate and Construction Management

Noell Jackson, The Women’s College

Carol Johnson, Daniels College of Business, Department of Marketing

Laura Robinson, The Women’s College

Andrea Stanton, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Religious Studies

Karyn Sweeney, Office of Internationalization

Susan Tyburski, The Women’s College

 

Spring 2010

Clark Davis, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of English

Christof Demont-Heinrich, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

Rodney Herring, University Writing Program

Cynthia Hollenbach, Daniels College of Business, School of Accountancy

Daniel Lair, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Human Communication Studies

Maik Nwosu, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of English

John Tiedemann, University Writing Program

 

Fall 2009

Debra Carney, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Mathematics

Scott Howard, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of English

Michael Keables, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Geography

Annette Locke, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Department of Mathematics

Derigan Silver, Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Media, Film and Journalism Studies

The OTL provides instructional design assistance and workshops for faculty members interested in developing online courses. Online instructors must complete the OTL’s Teaching Online Workshop (TOW) before teaching an online course.

Teaching Online

Teaching Online

What is the Teaching Online Initiative?

In 2009, 14 DU faculty members participated in a pilot project to explore the value of providing traditional undergraduate students the opportunity to take online courses. These faculty members completed the Teaching Online Workshop and participated in a series of faculty development sessions to learn how to develop a quality online course. The vast majority of faculty members who participated in the pilot indicated that they felt that the faculty development activities were necessary for them to learn how to teach online, that the initial creation of an online course was time-consuming but that they would teach an online course again because of the generally positive outcomes they observed. The program has now expanded to include graduate level and hybrid courses.

What is the difference between an online and a hybrid/blended course?

An Online/Distance course is a course in which all or nearly all of the organized instruction is conducted online or by distance learning methodologies. A  Combined/Hybrid course is a course in which online (or other distance) instruction is combined with face to face instruction, where a substantial portion of the face to face instruction is replaced by online instruction.

Are there guidelines about online courses?

There is a minimum duration of four weeks for online courses and we recommend that online courses limit enrollment to no more than 20 students. It is important that online and hybrid courses are correctly identified as online or hybrid within the DU scheduling system. The schedule type is “Online/Distance” for online courses and “Combined/Hybrid Methodologies” for hybrid/blended courses.

Who to contact?

For more information about teaching online, contact Kathy Keairns.

Learn More

Thinking about teaching online? Take this Faculty Self-Assessment for Online Teaching Preparedness to see if you are ready for online teaching.

The Office of Teaching and Learning provides funding opportunities for DU faculty and departments that improve teaching practices and promote excellence in teaching and learning.

Online and Hybrid Courses

Online and Hybrid Courses

Teaching Online Short Course

Over 280 faculty members have completed the Teaching Online Short Course or  Teaching Online Workshop (TOW) since Fall 2009! Here’s what some recent participants have said about their experience:

Dr. Gregory Robbins
"While demanding, the Teaching Online Workshop is well worth the effort it takes. Beyond learning how to negotiate Canvas and being introduced to the Quality Matters Program for online course design, you receive astonishingly detailed feedback as you build your course from instructors who have terrific pedagogical instincts, who review your materials with tremendous care, and who offer invaluable suggestions and strategies for improvement."

Dr. Gregory Robbins, Chair, Department of Religious Studies

2014-08-28T10:13:07+00:00

Dr. Gregory Robbins, Chair, Department of Religious Studies

Dr. Gregory Robbins
“While demanding, the Teaching Online Workshop is well worth the effort it takes. Beyond learning how to negotiate Canvas and being introduced to the Quality Matters Program for online course design, you receive astonishingly detailed feedback as you build your course from instructors who have terrific pedagogical instincts, who review your materials with tremendous care, View Full →
Dr. Elizabeth Drogin
"The TOW was invaluable in preparing me to teach my first online course. The workshop provided a wealth of resources and strategies for teaching online, as well as opportunities to experiment with specific tools and approaches in a supportive environment. Most helpful, though, was the incredible amount of personal attention and feedback provided by the instructors. I would highly recommend this course to anyone considering teaching online."

Dr. Elizabeth Drogin, Lecturer, Writing Program

2014-08-28T11:00:15+00:00

Dr. Elizabeth Drogin, Lecturer, Writing Program

Dr. Elizabeth Drogin
“The TOW was invaluable in preparing me to teach my first online course. The workshop provided a wealth of resources and strategies for teaching online, as well as opportunities to experiment with specific tools and approaches in a supportive environment. Most helpful, though, was the incredible amount of personal attention and feedback provided by the View Full →
Dr. Christy Rossi
“Having the opportunity to be a student in an online learning environment was really valuable. I experienced firsthand how helpful it is to receive information about the learning modality and course organization early on, to ensure that students know what to expect before tackling course content."

Dr. Christy Rossi, Lecturer, Department of Psychology

2014-09-02T11:21:40+00:00

Dr. Christy Rossi, Lecturer, Department of Psychology

Dr. Christy Rossi
“Having the opportunity to be a student in an online learning environment was really valuable. I experienced firsthand how helpful it is to receive information about the learning modality and course organization early on, to ensure that students know what to expect before tackling course content.”
Dr. Omar Gudino
"Participating in the TOW helped me recognize what quality online learning looks like and changed my perception of online courses for the better. As a student in this online workshop, I was able to experience firsthand how thoughtful course design and judicious use of multimedia tools can come together to create a rich learning environment. Practically speaking, the TOW also provided a fantastic opportunity to develop a course with thoughtful feedback and ongoing support from the instructors and my colleagues. The TOW is a wonderful resource for any instructor who is new to online teaching."

Dr. Omar Gudino, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

2014-09-03T14:48:12+00:00

Dr. Omar Gudino, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Dr. Omar Gudino
“Participating in the TOW helped me recognize what quality online learning looks like and changed my perception of online courses for the better. As a student in this online workshop, I was able to experience firsthand how thoughtful course design and judicious use of multimedia tools can come together to create a rich learning environment. View Full →
Dr. Jim Platt
“Don’t be afraid to sign up for this valuable workshop even if you are a technology novice as I was. The TOW faculty were exceptionally helpful, understanding, and patient with those of us who were “technologically challenged."

Dr. James Platt, Department of Biological Sciences, retired.

2014-09-10T16:52:23+00:00

Dr. James Platt, Department of Biological Sciences, retired.

Dr. Jim Platt
“Don’t be afraid to sign up for this valuable workshop even if you are a technology novice as I was. The TOW faculty were exceptionally helpful, understanding, and patient with those of us who were “technologically challenged.”

The Teaching Online Short Course (formerly Teaching Online Workshop) is an intensive online course designed to prepare faculty members  to teach an online course. By DU’s definition, an online course is a course in which all or nearly all of the organized instruction is conducted online. Completing the course is a requirement for DU faculty members planning to teach online.

What is the Teaching Online Short Course?

The Teaching Online Short Course is offered 2-4 times per year depending on demand. The course is delivered entirely online and instructors experience online learning first-hand from the student perspective. After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  1. Locate OTL resources related to online course facilitation and design.
  2. Identify methods for engaging and motivating online learners.
  3. Recognize appropriate uses for assessment tools (assignments, quizzes, rubrics, etc.).
  4. Identify effective techniques for providing feedback.
  5. Demonstrate best practices for facilitating discussion boards.
  6. Apply experience as an online learner to the facilitation of your own course.

Thinking about teaching online? Take this Faculty Self-Assessment for Online Teaching Preparedness to see if you are ready for online teaching.

What is the time commitment?

Schedule and Estimated Faculty Time Commitment

3 Weeks Online – 6-12 hours per week (varies based on your level of experience with Canvas and number of times you have taught the course)

Note: To be eligible for the workshop,  participants must be familiar with Canvas and have completed the DU Canvas Instructor Tutorial course.

Why do I have to take a course before I can teach online?

The University of Denver is committed to providing our students with quality online courses and online course development & delivery requires a high level of organization and different methods and strategies than traditional classroom instruction. It is important to pay careful attention to course organization and facilitation to improve student engagement, learning, and retention in online courses. By participating in the Teaching Online short course, faculty members will experience online learning from the student perspective, and learn best practices for developing and facilitating online courses.

Full-time DU faculty members who complete the Teaching Online Short Course are eligible to receive up to a $1000.  A $500 stipend will be awarded after successfully completing the Teaching Online Short Course. An additional $500 will be awarded after teaching an online course at DU.

When is the next Teaching Online Short Course?

Below are the dates for the next Teaching Online Short Course sessions.

Winter Term: Monday, January 21 – Sunday, February 10, 2019 – Register

Spring Term: Monday, April 1 – Sunday, April 21, 2019

Keep in mind that we reserve the right to cancel a session if we do not have a minimum of 5 people registered to take the course. Contact Kathy Keairns if you would like to be added to the notification list for upcoming Teaching Online Short Course sessions. You will be sent an official registration form before the session begins.

Learn More

Who to contact?

For more information, contact Kathy Keairns.


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