Teaching Consultations

A teaching consultation is a commonly used method of continual professional enrichment, allowing you time and space to gather feedback, reflect on your teaching practices and brainstorm ideas and techniques to improve student learning.

What is a teaching consultation?

Teaching consultations with OTL staff members are confidential meetings driven by the goals and interests of the faculty member. Following a consultation you receive a letter documenting the visit, which you can use in any way you choose.

Teaching consultations may include:

  • Video recording of a class session followed by a personal consultation.
  • In-person class observation by an OTL consultant, followed with a personal consultation.
  • Discussion and feedback about a particular teaching method or assignment.
  • Discussion and brainstorming about taking your teaching to the next level.

How will a teaching consultation benefit me?

Many faculty members engage in annual or recurring teaching consultations to remain purposeful and effective in their teaching.

“Our meeting really helped me to gain confidence in grading and helped me improve my clarity for student expectations. I think my classes are going much better as a result. Thank you!!”
- Lynn Schofield Clark, Media, Film, & Journalism Studies

“Thanks so much. You gave me plenty of really solid and tangible ways to improve my students learning. I look forward to incorporating your ideas.”
- Vaneesha Boney-Dutra, Reiman School of Finance, Daniels College of Business

How can I learn more?

The following resources can help you learn more about the teaching consultation process.

Who to contact?

Teaching consultations are conducted by the individuals listed below. If you’d like to schedule a teaching consultation, contact one of them or Cheryl Jackson with a brief explanation of your interests.

If you would like the OTL to arrange to video-record a class you are teaching, please send the following information to Cheryl Jackson:

  • Your name
  • Name of the course to record
  • Classroom location
  • At least two possible dates and times to record
© 2014 University of Denver - Office of Teaching & Learning